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“A cup of tea with our CBD agent…”: community provision of injectable contraceptives in Kenya is safe and feasible

Journal Article
(Published October, 2013)
Olawo, A. (Author),
Bashir, I. (Author),
Solomon, M. (Author),
Stanbeck, J. (Author),
Ndugga, B. (Author),
Malonza, I. (Author)
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The article describes a pilot project to generate local evidence on safety, feasibility and acceptability of the provision of injectable DMPA by community health workers (CHWs). A total of 31 CHWs were trained to provide injectable DMPA in addition to pills and condoms. Data were collected on family planning clients served by CHWs from August 2009 to September 2010, as well as data on those who received services from three health facilities in the CHW catchment area. During the 12-month study period, CHWs reached 1,210 women with family planning services, including referrals for long-acting and permanent methods. Family planning use in the pilot sites for all methods increased an estimated fivefold, from 9% in facilities to 46% when facilities and CHWs were combined (32% for CHWs and 14% for facilities). The majority (69%) of clients served by CHWs chose DMPA. No client reported any signs of infection at the injection site nor did any CHW report needlestick injuries or other adverse events. The re-injection rate was 68% at the third visit, which compares favorably with other DMPA continuation studies. The authors conclude that injectable contraception provided by trained CHWs is a safe, acceptable and feasible service delivery option in Kenya.

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Citation: 
Olawo AAB, Bashir, Issak; Solomon, Marsden ; Stanback, John; Ndugga, Baker Maggwa; Malonza, Isaac “A cup of tea with our CBD agent…”: community provision of injectable contraceptives in Kenya is safe and feasible Global Health: Science and Practice 2013 (October 2013)