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Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Uptake and Associated Factors among Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Kenya

Journal Article
(Published May, 2019)
Ontiri, S. (Author),
Ndirangu, G. (Author),
Kabue, M. (Author),
Biesma, R. (Author),
Stekelenburg, J. (Author),
Ouma, C. (Author)
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In the last two decades, the use of short-acting methods of contraception has driven the increase of contraceptive use in Kenya. We assessed the factors associated with uptake of long-acting reversible contraception by women seeking family planning services in public health facilities in Kakamega County, Kenya. A mixed methods cross-sectional study through client exit surveys among 423 women seeking family planning services was done at 12 public health facilities in Kakamega County. Twelve in-depth interviews with health care providers from the study facilities further explored practices in provision of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Among women initiating contraceptive use, LARC method utilization was 20.6%. Women’s tertiary education level, Protestant Christian religion, age at first birth, and having no desire for more children were significantly associated with utilization of LARC. Structural factors including shortage of human resource, provider bias and lack of adequate skills on provision of services were identified as key barriers to uptake of long-acting reversible contraception services.

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Citation: 
Ontiri S, Ndirangu G, Kabue M, Biesma R, Stekelenburg J, Ouma C. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Uptake and Associated Factors among Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Kenya. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091543