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Practice analysis of junior doctors in Ethiopia: implications for strengthening medical education, practice and regulation

Journal Article
(Published November, 2018)
Dejene, D. (Author),
Yigzaw, T. (Author),
Mengistu, S. (Author),
Wolde, Z. (Author),
Hiruy, A (Author),
Woldemariam, D. (Author),
Awol, M. (Author)
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A high performing physician workforce is critical to attain nationally set health sector goals. Ethiopia has expanded training of medical doctors. This practice analysis study identifies gaps in Ethiopian medical education and practice, and determines composition of subjects in the national licensing examination.  A total of 191 junior doctors participated in this cross-sectional study; most were males (74.6%) and had less than 2 years of experience (69.8%). Junior doctors frequently performed tasks of internal medicine and pediatrics. Their participation in obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, psychiatry and dentistry services was infrequent. Junior doctors had competency gaps to conduct clinical procedures, research and health programming tasks. Practice analysis results and expert ratings generated comparable recommendations for composition of a national licensing examination, with more than three-quarters of the items focusing on internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and public health. Junior doctors in Ethiopia rarely managed psychiatry, ophthalmology and dental patients. They had competence gaps in clinical procedures, research and health programming skills. The findings have implications for establishing licensing examination, and reviewing curriculum, continuing professional development, placement and rotation policy, and distribution of responsibilities.
 

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Citation: 
Dejene D, Yigzaw T, Mengistu S, Wolde Z, Hiruy A, Woldemariam D, et al. Practice analysis of junior doctors in Ethiopia: implications for strengthening medical education, practice and regulation. Glob Health Res Policy. 2018;3:31