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Occupational Segregation, gender essentialism and male primacy as major barriers to equity in HIV care giving: Findings from Lesotho

Journal Article
(Published June, 2011)
Newman, C.J. (Author),
Fogarty, L. (Author),
Makoae, L.N. (Author),
Reavely, E. (Author)
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Capacity Project partnered with the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in a study of the gender dynamics of HIV/AIDS caregiving in three districts of Lesotho to account for men’s absence in HIV/AIDS caregiving and investigate ways in which they might be recruited into the community and home-based care (CHBC) workforce. HIV/AIDS caregiving is a gender-segregated job, at the core of which lie stereotypes and beliefs about the appropriate work of men and women. Policymakers, activists and programmers must redress the persistent disadvantages faced by the mostly female caregiving workforce and the gendered economic, psychological, and social impacts entailed in HIV/AIDS caregiving.

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Newman CJ, Fogarty L, Makoae LN, Reavely E. Occupational segregation, gender essentialism and male primacy as major barriers to equity in HIV/AIDS caregiving: Findings from Lesotho. Int J Equity Health. 2011. 10(24).